kumasenpai:

Just swagged on everyone.

(Source: sizvideos)

rip-homegirl:

let’s talk about the universe and make out


afro-dominicano:

NGC 2070 (30 Doradus, The Tarantula Nebula) in Dorado

In HaLRGB and Ha filters, and an annotated version.

The Tarantula Nebula (also known as 30 Doradus, or NGC 2070) is an H II region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC).

The Tarantula Nebula has an apparent magnitude of 8. Considering its distance of about 49 kpc (160 000 light years), this is an extremely luminous non-stellar object. Its luminosity is so great that if it were as close to Earth as the Orion Nebula, the Tarantula Nebula would cast shadows. In fact, it is the most active starburst region known in the Local Group of galaxies.

It is also the largest such region in the Local Group with an estimated diameter of 200 pc. The nebula resides on the leading edge of the LMC, where ram pressure stripping, and the compression of the interstellar medium likely resulting from this, is at a maximum.

At its core lies the compact star cluster R136 (approximate diameter 35 light years) that produces most of the energy that makes the nebula visible. The estimated mass of the cluster is 450 000 solar masses, suggesting it will likely become a globular cluster in the future.

© Velimir Popov, Emil Ivanov


mashable:

Levitating Speaker Is Like Your Own Bluetooth Audio Death Star

Using the now well-known idea of magnetic levitation, the OM/ONE speaker floats about an inch off its base, allowing the user to spin it around in mid-air while listening to the audio.


(Source: sosuperawesome)


(Source: angelintherain)


science-junkie:

What is the Multiverse, and why do we think it exists? 

[…] Our observable Universe caps out at about 92 billion light-years in diameter, less than a thousand times as large in all directions as our previous scale. It contains some 10^80 atoms, clumped together in maybe a trillion galaxies, each with typically hundreds of billions of stars. But one of the most remarkable things about the Big Bang is that all of this, some 13.8 billion years ago, was once contained in a very small region of space, a region much smaller than our Solar System is today!

The thing that you might immediately wonder is whether there’s more Universe beyond the part that’s observable to us today, and — if so — how far does it go on? And what does it look like? And what are the physical laws in that part of the Universe?

Based on our observations of everything we’ve been able to see, from stars to galaxies to the leftover glow from the Big Bang to the matter in intergalactic space, we can learn some amazing things.

Read the full article by Ethan Siegel


two-kinds-of-pain:

levindis:

I can’t stress the importance of good character naming enough.

😂😂